Error loading page.
Try refreshing the page. If that doesn't work, there may be a network issue, and you can use our self test page to see what's preventing the page from loading.
Learn more about possible network issues or contact support for more help.

Time and Clocks

A Description of Ancient and Modern Methods of Measuring Time

by Henry Cunynghame

eBook

50 of 50 copies available

Originally published in 1906. Delves into the physics of time measurement. Includes a description of the parts of a pendulum clock and a description of how watches work. From Chapter I, "Time is one of the most mysterious of our elementary ideas. It seems to exist or not to exist, according as we are thinking or not thinking. It seems to run or stand still and to go fast or slowly. How it drags through a wearisome lesson; how it flies during a game of cricket; how it seems to stop in sleep. If we measured time by our own thoughts it would be a very uncertain quantity. But other considerations seem to show us that Nature knows no such uncertainty as regards time, that she produces her phenomena in a uniform manner in uniform times, and that time has an existence independent of our thoughts and wills." Includes illustrations and an index.

Expand title description text
Publisher: Project Gutenberg

OverDrive Read

  • File size: 2603 KB
  • Release date: April 18, 2017

Open EPUB eBook

  • File size: 2603 KB
  • Release date: April 18, 2017

50 of 50 copies available

Formats

OverDrive Read
Open EPUB eBook

Languages

English

Originally published in 1906. Delves into the physics of time measurement. Includes a description of the parts of a pendulum clock and a description of how watches work. From Chapter I, "Time is one of the most mysterious of our elementary ideas. It seems to exist or not to exist, according as we are thinking or not thinking. It seems to run or stand still and to go fast or slowly. How it drags through a wearisome lesson; how it flies during a game of cricket; how it seems to stop in sleep. If we measured time by our own thoughts it would be a very uncertain quantity. But other considerations seem to show us that Nature knows no such uncertainty as regards time, that she produces her phenomena in a uniform manner in uniform times, and that time has an existence independent of our thoughts and wills." Includes illustrations and an index.

Expand title description text